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“Politics should be the part-time profession of every citizen who would protect the rights and privileges of free people and who would preserve what is good and fruitful in our national heritage.” Dwight D. Eisenhower

Archive for the ‘Religion’ Category

Riots In Akko on Yom Kippur

Posted by Atilla89 on October 14, 2008

I have a major deadline coming up so I won’t be posting for a while. I’m just going to briefly comment on the Akko riots. Firstly, it was a disgrace on both parts. Regardless of whether the Arab driver was drinking and blasting loud music as he drove through the Jewish Quarter during Yom Kippur, the response by the Jews in the area was disgusting. This may seem obvious to you and me but if someone is upsetting the peace, call the police! Don’t take matters into your own hand by trying to stone the man! Secondly, the response given by Arab-Israeli MK Ahmed Tibi (UAL) was disgraceful. And as well as this, Arab MK Mohammed Barakeh stated that the alleged attack by Jews was “similar to the pogroms that Jews were exposed to at the hands of the Nazi gangs in Germany.” We really just don’t need those types of comments and it just makes you look bad and ignorant. Thankfully law and order has been restored and I really hope this won’t happen next Yom Kippur.

As a treat, here is a documentary that I’ve found on YouTube that have some significance on upcoming events with Iran – enjoy.

History – Israeli airstrike on Iraqi nuclear reactor (1981)

Posted in Antisemitism, Arab, Arabs, Israel, Jews, Middle-East, Religion | Leave a Comment »

How The U.S. Have Tried To Make Friends With Iran

Posted by Atilla89 on October 8, 2008

Many people believe that from 1979 onwards, the only contact that America has had with Iran is through proxy wars in Lebanon and Iraq. The view is completely wrong and in fact the opposite is true. While it would be correct to say that America has had a frosty relationship with Iran, this hasn’t stopped them from trying to be allies since the moment Iran, as we know it today, was born. More from the Jerusalem Post:

Almost 30 years ago, president Jimmy Carter tried to show what a nice guy he was by pressing the shah of Iran not to crush the revolutionaries. After the monarch fell, national security adviser Zbigniew Brzezinski met top officials of the new Islamist regime to pledge US friendship to the government controlled by Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini.

https://i2.wp.com/upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/9f/Khomeini_Famous_Portrait.jpg

Ruhollah Khomeini

This may seem strange, but don’t forget at this time, Khomeini was seen to have the majority of popular Iranian support, it would seem only natural to support the guy that everyone else likes. Plus don’t forget that Iran still hadn’t kidnapped anybody or started up Hezbollah, yet. However this all changed when only:

Three days after the Brzezinski meeting, in November 1979, the Islamist regime’s cadre seized the US embassy and its staff as hostages, holding them until January 1981. This was our introduction to the new Middle East of radical Islamism. Carter continued his weak stance, persuading the Teheran regime that it could get away with anything. The hostages were only released because Iran was suffering desperately from an Iraqi invasion and feared Carter’s successor, Ronald Reagan, as someone likely to be tougher.

This is just one of the many reasons why I view Carter as the worst U.S. President in history. As usual, Carter lost whatever backbone he had and instead of trying to get rescue the hostages (he held off until April 24, 1980 and even then the attempt failed) he negotiated with a rogue state, even when it was obvious that he was failing. Now this is where relations between Iran and America get really interesting:

On September 29, while [US Secretary of Defense Robert Gates] giving a lecture at the National Defense University in Washington, someone asked him how the next president might improve relations with Iran. Gates responded: “I have been involved in the search for the elusive Iranian moderate for 30 years.” Then Gates revealed what was actually said at Brzezinski’s meeting, in which he has been a participatant, summarizing Brzezinski’s position as follows: “We will accept your revolution… We will recognize your government. We will sell you all the weapons that we had contracted to sell the shah… We can work together in the future.”‘

Knowing this completely changes the view that America has always rejected diplomacy with its enemies. After reading this, it becomes clear that it was America who made the first move to try and open diplomatic relations with the new regimes only to be rebuffed and taken advantaged of.

Far from persuading Khomeini that the US was a real threat, the US government made itself appear a pitiful, helpless giant, convincing Teheran – as Khomeini himself put it – that America couldn’t do a damn thing. His revolution and ideology were too strong for it.

Now if this isn’t enough to persuade you how futile it is to try and negotiate with these people, maybe this will help:

Former US Marine Col. Timothy Geraghty was Marine commander in October 1983 when suicide bombers attacked the barracks of US peacekeeping forces in Beirut, killing 242 Americans. He now reveals that a September 26, 1983 US intelligence intercept showed Iran’s government ordering the attack through its embassy in Lebanon. The timid response to that operation set a pattern leading directly to the September 11 attack.

America has tried to help them, negotiate with them, only give them weak sanctions and after all that they get attacked in their own embassy and lose valuable military personnel to Iranian made and supplied bombs in Lebanon and Iraq. Maybe its time to take a real stand against terrorism and nuclear proliferation?

Posted in Hizbullah, Iran, Islamism, Lebanon, Middle-East, Military, Religion, Terrorism, U.S. Politics, US, War | 2 Comments »

How Education Is The Key For Peace Between Israel And The Palestinians

Posted by Atilla89 on August 12, 2008

If you’ve ever wondered how to stop the cycle of violence that plagues Israel and the Gaza Strip & West Bank then I have the answer for you, education. This may seem a little bit strange but education has the most say in a child’s outlook on the world. When I say education I am not just referring to going to school and then coming home to do homework and study. I am talking about the education that children receive from their parents, their friends, their religion and the media both independent and state-sponsored.

When a child learns to hate a particular people or religion from an early age, that hatred stays with them for a long time. When the message is continually hammered into them from every source of education it is almost impossible to undo the effects of such an upbringing. Of course, I am talking about the education that is continually forced upon Palestinian children. In my opinion, it would take generations to undo the damage being done to the Palestinian children in the Gaza Strip and West Bank. However outlining a brief plan of such a solution is not the point of this post. My aim is to show one particular grotesque way in which such a hatred of Israel and Jews is being fostered upon Palestinian children.

For example, a recent article in Pajamas Media titled ‘How Gaza Kids Are Spending Their Summer Vacation‘ is a great example of this ‘education’. When most people think of school holidays (especially summer) they think of going to the beach to relax, maybe going to a summer camp (known as a Sport and Recreation camp in Australia), you get the picture. However in the Gaza Strip, summer holidays means something completely different:

‘Hamas and Islamic Jihad, ever mindful of their responsibilities as pillars of the Palestinian community, are running their annual summer camps for thousands of youngsters…In addition to receiving healthy doses of religious and political indoctrination, they’ll be learning how to handle weapons and navigate assault courses.’

Hang on you say, did I read that last part right? They are letting children handle weapons? These sorts of descriptions sadly no longer surprise me (think Farfour, the Hamas version of Micky Mouse), indeed they are almost the norm now in Gaza. However to somebody else who has no idea about Palestinian society this would come as a shock and rightly so, this sort of treatment is disgusting.

‘An Islamic Jihad operative was at pains to point out to Ynet that children would only be handling dummy rockets, not real ones. Allah forbid that they should play with real Qassams or Katyushas — someone could lose an eye.’

Because that is any better…

Of course, this not anything new. During March I wrote a post very similar to this one in which I showed a video of children giving out flowers and lollies to passing Palestinians celebrating the recent (then) terrorist attackat Dimona. These sorts of actions just illustrate my point of how education is the key to stopping this conflict. Golda Meir, a former Prime Minister of Israel got it right when she said that peace would only be possible “when the Arabs love their children more than they hate us”.

Posted in Antisemitism, Arabs, Fatah, Hamas, Islamic Jihad, Islamism, Israel, Jews, Middle-East, Military, Palestine, Religion, Terrorism, War, Zionism | 6 Comments »

Heavy Metal Monk

Posted by Atilla89 on July 19, 2008

As you have probably realised, I really enjoy listening to heavy metal music. This has to be one of the strangest occurrences that I have ever seen happen in metal.

Brother Cesare is the lead singer in a heavy metal band which has just released its second album.

A former missionary in the Ivory Coast, he lives in a small friary in the Milan hinterland.

The 62-year-old monk’s love affair with heavy metal began when he attended a Metallica concert some 15 years ago.

“I was overwhelmed and amazed by the sheer energy of it” he says.

I would absolutely love to see this guy in concert, I think it would be very funny. Long hair and robes flying  everywhere while a 62 year old is head banging.

Posted in Metal, Religion | Leave a Comment »

In Good Faith Documentary

Posted by Atilla89 on May 28, 2008

A really interesting documentary/talk show/discussion has just come out from SBS (an Australian TV channel) which would be a good watch particularly in today’s political environment. The documentary is called In Good Faith and is about the impact of religion in faith-based schools. It goes into detail about whether religion should be taught in science classes, etc. Personally I believe that religion should have no part at all in science class because science is fact and religion is not. However I am all for religion being taught in schools especially if it is a faith-based one. I myself went to a Jewish faith based school and I really enjoyed. There was no religion in the science class but we did Hebrew up until year 8 (13-14 yo) and Jewish studies to year 10 (15-16 yo). The links below go to SBS’s media player however I have no doubt that in the future this documentary will be up on YouTube.

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

Posted in Australian Politics, Religion | Leave a Comment »

An Anatomy of Surrender

Posted by Atilla89 on April 28, 2008

Firstly, I had a really great Pesach Seder, lots of people. I got a present from my aunt, a book called Tobruk by Peter Fitzsimons which I will start reading as soon as I get the chance. In the meantime, here’s a nice piece from Bruce Bawer detailing how the West has surrended culturally to Islamism. The paper talks about how the West’s media, acedemia and artists have betrayed their ideals (namely freedom of speech) to kowtow to Islamism. The byline of this article is Motivated by fear and multiculturalism, too many Westerners are acquiescing to creeping sharia. Hat tip to LGF for this one. Here’s the link to the article.

Enough. We need to recognize that the cultural jihadists hate our freedoms because those freedoms defy sharia, which they’re determined to impose on us. So far, they have been far less successful at rolling back freedom of speech and other liberties in the U.S. than in Europe, thanks in no small part to the First Amendment. Yet America is proving increasingly susceptible to their pressures.

The key question for Westerners is: Do we love our freedoms as much as they hate them? Many free people, alas, have become so accustomed to freedom, and to the comfortable position of not having to stand up for it, that they’re incapable of defending it when it’s imperiled—or even, in many cases, of recognizing that it is imperiled. As for Muslims living in the West, surveys suggest that many of them, though not actively involved in jihad, are prepared to look on passively—and some, approvingly—while their coreligionists drag the Western world into the House of Submission.

But we certainly can’t expect them to take a stand for liberty if we don’t stand up for it ourselves.

Actually after reading this, I sometimes wonder if in Australia we should have a Bill of Rights as well in order to further cement our ideals and values to stop Islamists or some other group trying to censor what we say. If anyone here has an opinion on this feel welcome to share it in the comments section.

Posted in Australian Politics, Europe, Islam, Islamism, Religion, Terrorism, U.S. Politics | Leave a Comment »

Happy Pesach and Chag Sameach!

Posted by Atilla89 on April 19, 2008

Just wishing everybody a happy Pesach and Chag Sameach! I am definitely looking forward to this Pesach as my mother will be making her trademark (and best) chocolate Matza’s as well as this, the Seder which I will be going to will have around 40 people! Before I leave, here’s the link for Michael Totten’s new post about the tribes in Iraq and how the Marines are trying to use them to contain a sustainable democracy.

Captain Jones and Mayor of Karmah.jpg

Captain Quintin Jones and Mayor Abu Abdullah

Also I leave you with another link to an article written by Margot Dudkevitch from Infolive.tv about the amount of weapons that are being smuggled into the Gaza Strip through the most interesting ways.

In recent months,  Iran has increased its efforts to smuggle weapons into the Gaza Strip via the sea and also tunnels between Egypt and Gaza, sending the Hamas and Islamic Jihad terror groups there not only weapons and rifles but advanced Iranian made rockets and mortar shells.

A report in the Jerusalem Post says that many of the weapons are too big to smuggle through the tunnels built underneath the Philadelphi Corridor linking Egypt and the Gaza Strip, and therefore resort to dropping them off the waters in Gaza in waterproof sealed tubes.

Posted in Hamas, Hizbullah, IDF, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jews, Lebanon, Middle-East, Military, Palestine, Religion, Terrorism | 1 Comment »

Why I Won’t Be Celebrating 60 Years Of Israel: Rebuttal

Posted by Atilla89 on March 14, 2008

For those who have not heard of Antony Loewenstein I suggest you Google his name now. To put it bluntly every single anti-Zionist will love this guy while everyone who stands for truth will despise him. He’s just written a most ridiculous article for the ABC, read it here. Now enjoy me showing just how false Loewenstein is.

Like Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd’s recent apology to the
Stolen Generations, the local Jewish community celebrated the gesture
of reconciliation to the indigenous population, but as I wrote in
Haaretz remained unwilling to extend this sentiment to the
Palestinians.

Gee, I wonder why? Maybe because it is rightfully our land even though we were quite prepared to submit to the UN Resolution to divide it with the Palestinians.

The fact that Israel’s continued colonisation of the occupied territories has made a two-state solution almost impossible is unmentionable. The motion received bipartisan support.

Loewenstein talks of the settlements being a barrier to peace in the region. Let me demonstrate how that is false.

  • From 1949-67, when Jews were forbidden to live on the West Bank, the Arabs refused to make peace with Israel.
  • From 1967-77, the Labor Party established only a few strategic settlements in the territories, yet the Arabs were unwilling to negotiate peace with Israel.
  • In 1977, months after a Likud government committed to greater settlement activity took power, Egyptian President Sadat went to Jerusalem and later signed a peace treaty with Israel. Incidentally, Israeli settlements existed in the Sinai and those were removed as part of the agreement with Egypt.
  • One year later, Israel froze settlement building for three months, hoping the gesture would entice other Arabs to join the Camp David peace process. But none would.
  • In 1994, Jordan signed a peace agreement with Israel and settlements were not an issue. If anything, the number of Jews living in the territories was growing.
  • Between June 1992 and June 1996, under Labor-led governments, the Jewish population in the territories grew by approximately 50 percent. This rapid growth did not prevent the Palestinians from signing the Oslo accords in September 1993 or the Oslo 2 agreement in September 1995.
  • In 2000, Prime Minister Ehud Barak offered to dismantle dozens of settlement, but the Palestinians still would not agree to end the conflict.

Source: http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/myths/mf22a.html#b

However, Labor backbenchers were unhappy about the motion, with Julia
Irwin telling ABC radio that she found “it hard to congratulate a
country which carries out human rights abuses each day, and shows
blatant disregard for the United Nations.”

That is just blatantly false.

Arabs in Israel have equal voting rights; in fact, it is one of the few places in the Middle East where Arab women may vote. Arabs currently hold 8 seats in the 120-seat Knesset. Israeli Arabs have also held various government posts, including one who served as Israel’s ambassador to Finland and the current deputy mayor of Tel Aviv. Oscar Abu Razaq was appointed Director General of the Ministry of Interior, the first Arab citizen to become chief executive of a key government ministry. Ariel Sharon’s original cabinet included the first Arab minister, Salah Tarif, a Druze who served as a minister without portfolio. An Arab is also a Supreme Court justice. Arabic, like Hebrew, is an official language in Israel. More than 300,000 Arab children attend Israeli schools. At the time of Israel’s founding, there was one Arab high school in the country. Today, there are hundreds of Arab schools. In 2002, the Israeli Supreme Court also ruled that the government cannot allocate land based on religion or ethnicity, and may not prevent Arab citizens from living wherever they choose.

Source: http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/myths/mf18.html#a

Though IDF actions have caused hardship for the Palestinian population, the IDF has continued to ensure that humanitarian assistance is provided to Palestinians in need. For example, during just one 48-hour period (January 5-6, 2003), the IDF:

  • Coordinated the movement of Palestinians seeking medical care, assisting 40 to go to hospitals, including four patients from Gaza who were transferred to Israel for medical treatment.
  • Coordinated the movement of 284 Palestinians in the West Bank who were transferred by ambulance.
  • Coordinated the passage of building materials for the construction of a hospital in Kalkilya.
  • Coordinated the passage of humanitarian goods to Bethlehem.
  • Coordinated entry of ration cards sent by an international aid organization to the residents of Azoun.
  • Enabled the distribution of ration cards by the Red Cross in Salfit.
  • Coordinated the passage of agricultural produce and food between Muassi and Khan Yunis.
  • Coordinated the passage of an UNRWA team in Gaza to aid in the disposal of rubbish.
  • Arranged entry into Kalkilya for an Israeli Arab family from East Jerusalem to attend their son’s wedding.

Even at the height of military action, such as the operation to clean out the terrorist nest in the Jenin refugee camp, Israeli forces have gone out of their way to assist Palestinian non-combatants. In the case of the Jenin operation, for example, the hospital there was kept running with a generator delivered under fire by an Israeli officer. The best way to improve the situation for the Palestinians in the territories is for the Palestinian Authority to take the steps laid out by the Bush Administration — end the violence, reform its institutions, and elect new leaders — so that peace talks may resume and a settlement can be negotiated.

Source: http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/myths/mf18.html#l

Now are you starting to see why I abhor these people?

I joined the petition protesting the motion because it negates the
Palestinian narrative and celebrates, even white-washes, the ethnic
cleansing that took place in 1948. …

Huh? What is he on about?

The Palestinians knew, despite their rhetoric to the contrary, the Jews were not trying to annihilate them; otherwise, they would not have been allowed to evacuate Tiberias, Haifa or any of the other towns captured by the Jews. Moreover, the Palestinians could find sanctuary in nearby states. The Jews, however, had no place to run had they wanted to. They were willing to fight to the death for their country. It came to that for many, because the Arabs were interested in annihilating the Jews, as Secretary-General of the Arab League Azzam Pasha made clear in an interview with the BBC on the eve of the war (May 15, 1948): “The Arabs intend to conduct a war of extermination and momentous massacre which will be spoken of like the Mongolian massacres and the Crusades.”

I am sure that he is thinking of Deir Yassin well read this source and decide for yourself.

Source: http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/myths/mf14.html#f

A new book by Jonathan Cook, a former Guardian journalist now based in
Nazareth, reveals the real agenda of the Jewish state and its
Washington masters. Israel and the Clash of Civilizations methodically
argues that regional chaos actually helps, not hinders, their imperial
plans. “The actual goal of the Israeli strategy,” Cook writes, is to
convince Western policy makers that “a series of civil wars and the
partition of Arab states” is beneficial to their interests. He goes
on:

Imperial plans? Why would Israel give back the Sinai, a whole heap of Lebanon, the Gaza Strip and be prepared to evacuate settlements in the West Bank if they were imperialist. Correct me if I am wrong but doesn’t ‘imperialist’ imply the invasion of other countries in order to control them… Hasn’t Israel been doing the opposite of that in the above examples?

By tying the fates of Israel’s occupation of the Palestinian
territories to the US occupation of Iraq, by miring the American
forces in the same, constant human rights abuses that Israeli forces
committed daily in the West Bank and Gaza, the two projects stood or
fell together. The futures of the Israeli and US occupations became
inextricably entwined. … Zionists in Australia refuse to acknowledge a recent poll in Israel
that found a majority of citizens want to engage with Hamas. They
ignore the on-the-ground reality that leaves a two-state solution dead
in its tracks. The alternative is a truly democratic state, neither
Jewish nor Muslim.

Ignoring the first part because that was addressed above. Is Loewenstein supporting a 1 state solution? Hasn’t that already been discredited because it would involve Israel committing demographic suicide? A majority of Arabs in this ‘1 state’ would turn it into an Islamic Arab state that may as well be renamed Palestine. Tell me, was that the goal of Zionism to live in an Arab Islamic state as a minority? Hell no!

Posted in Arabs, Hamas, IDF, Islam, Israel, Jews, Jordan, Middle-East, Palestine, Religion, Terrorism | Leave a Comment »

Jordanian MP’s Call To End Peace Treaty With Israel; Moses High On Sinai?

Posted by Atilla89 on March 14, 2008

I’ve decided on a double post for today. Jordan, at the moment has the best Arab alliance with Israel. However, that could start to come into doubt in regards to this news. Hat tip: Eye On The World.

At least 38 members of the Jordanian Parliament signed a petition on Thursday calling on Jordan to end its peace treaty with Israel, according to Ansamed. The parliament refused to vote on the petition, and several Islamic MPs left the hall in protest.

Islamic Action Front (IAF) head MP Hamzeh Mansour explained that the petition was a response to Israel’s “war crimes in Gaza,” as he termed recent IDF counterterrorism operations. The IAF would need a unanimous parliamentary vote in order to begin the process of ending Jordan’s peace treaty with Israel.

Personally, I don’t think Jordan will stop its peace treaty with Israel. For one thing, both countries have worked exceptionally hard to get their relations with each other where they are now. As well as this, I doubt America would be to happy with Jordan as well. Now something slightly more interesting. For those that are atheists, I doubt you will greet this with any major surprise, for those that aren’t, well, this guy may be onto something. Hat tip to Rantings of a Sandmonkey.

High on Mount Sinai, Moses was on psychedelic drugs when he heard God deliver the Ten Commandments, an Israeli researcher claimed in a study published this week.

Such mind-altering substances formed an integral part of the religious rites of Israelites in biblical times, Benny Shanon, a professor of cognitive psychology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem wrote in the Time and Mind journal of philosophy.

“As far Moses on Mount Sinai is concerned, it was either a supernatural cosmic event, which I don’t believe, or a legend, which I don’t believe either, or finally, and this is very probable, an event that joined Moses and the people of Israel under the effect of narcotics,” Shanon told Israeli public radio on Tuesday.

Moses was probably also on drugs when he saw the “burning bush,” suggested Shanon, who said he himself has dabbled with such substances.

The Bible says people see sounds, and that is a clasic phenomenon,” he said citing the example of religious ceremonies in the Amazon in which drugs are used that induce people to “see music.”

He mentioned his own experience when he used ayahuasca, a powerful psychotropic plant, during a religious ceremony in Brazil‘s Amazon forest in 1991. “I experienced visions that had spiritual-religious connotations,” Shanon said.

He said the psychedelic effects of ayahuasca were comparable to those produced by concoctions based on bark of the acacia tree, that is frequently mentioned in the Bible.

Posted in Arabs, IDF, Israel, Jews, Jordan, Middle-East, Random, Religion | 1 Comment »

UN Human Rights Council: Fair or Biased?

Posted by Atilla89 on October 2, 2007

Here is an article by Anne Bayefsky in regards to the UN Human Rights Council and its Resolutions. One of the more interesting statistics that it revealed was that (as of today) “74 percent of the Council’s moves against individual states have been directed at Israel, 21 percent at Sudan, 5 percent at Myanmar, and the rest of the world has been given a free pass.” This I find very interesting, to those that support this council, I ask (the obvious) what are they doing for other human rights abusers, the answer is nothing. But what is even more interesting is that the Organisation of Islamic Conference (OIC) and the Non-Aligned Movement (NAM) have the real power behind this council and any mention of Antisemitism is ignored yet when a “…few cartoons in a newspaper published some two-thirds the way to the North Pole… billion people have been gravely wounded…” One of my ‘favourite’ lines is by Pakistan, who, on behalf of the OIC state that “Islamophobia is also a crude form of anti-Semitism.” Interesting, no? Enjoy the read.

When President Bush told the United Nations General Assembly this week “the American people are disappointed by the failures of the Human Rights Council,” his words could not have been more timely or deserved. He pointed out “This body has been silent on repression by regimes from Havana to Caracas to Pyongyang and Tehran — while focusing its criticism excessively on Israel.” On Friday, the Council piled the dung heap higher. It wrapped up another session in Geneva by adopting two more resolutions against Israel and no resolutions critical of the human-rights record of any of the other 191 U.N. member states.

This brings the total of anti-Israel resolutions and decisions adopted by the “Human Rights” Council — in only the first 15 months of its operation — to 14. Another four very weak decisions and resolutions have been applied to Sudan. And the Council finally decided to hold a special session of the Council on Myanmar. So adding up the highly selective concerns of the U.N.’s lead human-rights agency: 74 percent of the Council’s moves against individual states have been directed at Israel, 21 percent at Sudan, 5 percent at Myanmar, and the rest of the world has been given a free pass.

European diplomats openly predict that within a year all U.N. special investigators dedicated to uncovering and reporting on human-rights violations in specific states will be abolished by the Council. These key mechanisms for human-rights protection were created with enormous difficulty over the past two decades. The axe wielded by the Non-Aligned Movement (NAM) and the Organization of the Islamic Conference (OIC) was first used in June to terminate the human-rights investigations on Cuba and Belarus. Then came the dithering over Sudan. While genocide continues in Darfur, the Council couldn’t decide this week whether a Sudan investigator was worth keeping. The matter was deferred for another three months. All other such investigators are on the chopping block — all that is, but one.

The only exception to the “rule” is the investigator assigned to Israel. The Council has extended the life of the Israel rapporteur until Council members deem the occupation to be over — notwithstanding that the controlling faction believe all of Israel to be occupied land. At the same time, there is no shortage of outbursts from the OIC railing against any other human rights investigator. With great indignation Egypt sputtered: “…decisions to create, review or discontinue a country mandate, should take into account the principles of cooperation and dialogue with the country…”

Israel-bashing, the sport of choice for U.N. diplomats the world over, presents a special conundrum for European diplomats. In its first month of operation the Council took a decision to hold a special session on Israel and then adopted a resolution containing a vitriolic attack on Israel, alone. The date was July 6, 2006 — a time when Hezbollah was making plans for a war it started shortly thereafter. The EU voted against both the decision to hold the special session and the resolution.

The 24-hour United Nations propaganda machine, however, never sleeps. There soon sprouted new resolutions to “follow-up” the first. The EU boldly held out when faced with the first such test — by abstaining on a follow-up item in December 2006. A few months later, and again today, the role of opposing the OIC was apparently too much to bear. The EU voted in favor of following-up a resolution with which it vehemently disagreed in the first place.

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Arabs, Israel, Middle-East, Palestine, Religion, Syria, UN | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »