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“Politics should be the part-time profession of every citizen who would protect the rights and privileges of free people and who would preserve what is good and fruitful in our national heritage.” Dwight D. Eisenhower

Iran Overcompensating For Something

Posted by Atilla89 on July 11, 2008

Hezbollah’s done it, now their masters want a piece of the action as well. Iran has decided to visually alter a missile test photo.

The Photoshopped version for comparison:

Photos curtesy of LGF.

“There’s no doubt the photo was doctored,” said Mark Fitzpatrick, director of the Non-Proliferation Program for the London-based International Institute For Strategic Studies. The image, posted yesterday on a website owned by Iran’s Revolutionary Guards, showed four missiles moments after launch, leaving trails of glowing exhaust and clouds of billowing brown dust. The scene was described as part of military maneuvers in which nine missiles were test fired, including an enhanced version of the Shahab-3.

The most obvious reason, of course is that there was a misfire, something that most men try to cover up and not talk about.

There was no immediate comment from Iranian government officials on the photos. “The whole purpose of these launches was to demonstrate Iran’s capabilities and a photo showing one out of four rockets failing doesn’t have the intended impact,” Mr Fitzpatrick said.

Of course there is always consequences for such a failure to impress.

Total, the French energy group, said that it was freezing its role in a $US10 billion project to develop the South Pars fields in the Gulf, the world’s largest gas reserves. The decision was a big step in a US campaign to put pressure on Iran to stop enriching uranium.

Dr Rice, who was speaking in the former Soviet republic of Georgia, said that Iran’s missile tests justified US plans for an anti-missile shield with bases in Eastern Europe. Russia is strongly opposed to the plan.

However, maybe protection might not be needed against such a pathetic attempt to make an impact.

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4 Responses to “Iran Overcompensating For Something”

  1. We should be careful what we assume about Iran, or any country.

    Puor bien savoir les choses, il en faut savoir le detail, et comme il est presque infini, nos connaissances sont toujours superficielles et imparfaites.

    Unfortunately, what we do know is that the Bush administration cannot be trusted to do what it says. Iraq taught us that lesson.

    “On ne donne rien si liberalement que ses conseils.”

    But it is the man who follows his own counsel, he’s the one that should lead.

  2. Atilla89 said

    I agree, neither do I trust Omert to do the right thing either. That guy is far more interested in trying to save his disgraceful political career.

  3. What Does Iran Want?
    I think more than anything to be able to defend their country. Iran wants the same things as Israel, security. Who can they trust?

    They remember 1979; Arabic nations who supported Iraq against Iran. The integrated financial, technical, and armaments that were provided by many Arab countries to support Arabic Iraq against non-Arab Iranians was responsible for death of about 500,000 Iranians and injury of several millions.

    They remember our financial and technical support of Sadam Hossein to use chemical bombs against Iranians.

    Iranians remember summer of 1953.

    President George Bush often states that Iran is threatening the interests of the Unites States in Persian Gulf! What are the interests of England and the United States in Persian Gulf, the Persian front door to Iran?
    A primer for discussion of these issues must start with review of British and the United States policies relative to the Persian Gulf region. Stephen Kinzer, a veteran New York Times correspondent, in his book “All the Shah’s Men, an American coup and the roots of Middle East Terror”, published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2003, brilliantly reconstructs the events leading to the present dilemma of the United States in the Middle East. The events described in this marvelous book are not fiction; the events actually happened during the summer of 1953 in Tehran, Iran.

    The United States Central Intelligence Agency operation Ajax staged coup d’état in 1953 against democratically elected Prime Minister Dr. Mohammad Mossadegh. Democracy was substituted with the despotic regime of Mohammad Reza Shah. The dawn of democracy in Iran, started in late 1880, flickered by democratically elected Mossadegh, was extinguished. This was the beginning of Iranian servitude once more to the interests of England and the United States. During his last years, Shah did not trust Iranian people; his inner palace was guarded by Israel commandos. Since 1979, the United States has been punishing Iranian people for ousting the immature, weak, despotic Mohammad Reza Shah. This punishment, Iranian assert, included Iraq invasion of Iran instigated by President Regan. During this war, the United States and her satellite nations helped materially and logistically Iraqi military forces to invade Iran and use chemical and biological weapons on Iranian population.

    Dr. Mohammad Mossadegh

    In the preface of his book, Kinzer recalls his conversation with an Iranian lady about Dr. Mohammad Mossadegh. He asked her: “What do you remember…about the coup against him?” She responded:

    “Why did you Americans do that terrible thing? We always loved America. To us, America was the great country, the perfect country, the country that helped us while other countries were exploiting us. But after that moment, no one in Iran ever trusted the United States again…”

    This un-American act was instigated by Winston Churchill-Anthony Eden of England and two American brothers John Foster Dulles (US Secretary of State) and Allen Dulles (Director of Central Intelligence Agency). The primary reason for this regime change was to subordinate Iranian people and exploit the Iranian natural resources.

    Harry Truman once said: “There is nothing new in the world except the histories you don not know.” Have we learned from our past mistakes committed during 1953 not to repeat it once more? This time the price would be much larger for both the Iranian and our American societies! We must stop George Bush with his neocolonialism.

    If you were the President of Iran, what would you do for your country?

    Please read Persian Paradox [http://www.geocities.com/stmtraveler/PersianPardox.htm].

  4. Anonymous said

    Quite right Atilla.

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