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An Interview With Max Boot And A Rant With Alan Dershowitz

Posted by Atilla89 on December 8, 2007

LGF just posted an interesting video from Commentary Magazine called An Interview with Max Boot. For those that don’t know, Max Boot is a pretty much a writer and a historian who currently works as a foreign policy adviser to Senator John McCain (so he has a lot of insight and knowledge about what he is talking about). The video is about Max Boot’s ‘his recent trip to Saudi Arabia, the NIE, and the progress we’re making in Iraq.’ I’ve posted a video with Max Boot previously, where he talked about similar issues, which you can see here.

Max Boot makes some interesting points about the NIE Report in which he says that people shouldn’t put that much faith in, because (paraphrasing) that there is not enough evidence to be able to say for sure that what the NIE Report says is completely accurate. Indeed in my previous post about the NIE, which you can see here, I mentioned (according to Bolton) the 5 points to keep in mind when reading or talking about the NIE Report.

Keeping this in mind, I also want to talk about what other people think about the NIE Report, namely one of my favourite academics, Alan Dershowitz. Now he believes that the NIE Report, to put it bluntly, is a load of crap.

The tactic is obvious and well-known to all intelligence officials with an IQ above room temperature. It goes like this: There are two tracks to making nuclear weapons: One is to conduct research and develop technology directly related to military use. That is what the United States did when it developed the atomic bomb during the Manhattan Project. The second track is to develop nuclear technology for civilian use and then to use the civilian technology for military purposes.

What every intelligence agency knows is that the most difficult part of developing weapons corresponds precisely to the second track, namely civilian use. In other words, it is relatively simple to move from track 2 to track 1 in a short period of time. As Valerie Lincy and Gary Milhollin, both experts on nuclear arms control, put it in a New York Times Op Ed on December 6, 2007:

“During the past year, a period when Iran’s weapons program was supposedly halted, the government has been busy installing some 3,000 gas centrifuges at its plant at Natanz. These machines could, if operated continuously for about a year, create enough enriched uranium to provide fuel for a bomb. In addition, they have no plausible purpose in Iran’s civilian nuclear effort. All of Iran’s needs for enriched uranium for its energy programs are covered by a contract with Russia.

I just want to add something to this, considering the huge oil reserves that Iran has, why would they need additional nuclear power? The answer should be obvious to even the most dim witted person in politics. Dershowitz continues to prove my point:

“Iran is also building a heavy water reactor at its research centre at Arak. This reactor is ideal for producing plutonium for nuclear bombs, but is of little use in an energy program like Iran’s, which does not use plutonium for reactor fuel. India, Israel and Pakistan have all built similar reactors-all with the purpose of fueling nuclear weapons. And why, by the way, does Iran even want a nuclear energy program, when it is sitting on an enormous pool of oil that is now skyrocketing in value? And why is Iran developing long-range Shahab missiles, which make no military sense without nuclear warheads to put on them?

Read the rest of this at FrontPage here.

Hat tip to LGF

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